Newsroom

For Nature’s Sake! A Forested Wetland is Saved

A new nature preserve on Central Whidbey Island is a haven for wildlife with 31 acres of forest and wetlands.


More Exciting Conservation Projects Are Underway

Among dozens of exciting conservation projects the Land Trust is working on, here are just a few we expect to complete in early 2020.


2018: A Remarkable Year for Island Conservation

In 2018, 10 properties, totaling 485 acres, were permanently protected throughout Whidbey and Camano islands. Here’s a summary of what you helped accomplish last year.


Restoration Underway at Silliman Preserve

The Land Trust plans for more than 1,300 native plants to go into the ground at the Silliman Preserve. It’s all part of the organization’s goal to enhance fish and wildlife habitat and help protect a functioning wetland system in the Maxwelton watershed.


Professor’s Passion: Restoring Wetland Wonder

Dr. Sievert Rohwer is curator emeritus of ornithology (birds) at the UW’s Burke Museum, but he also holds a soft spot for frogs, toads and other amphibians. By restoring the different habitats on his property, he’s brought back a healthy population of native amphibians.


Western Toads a Symbol of Restoration Success at Dugualla Preserve

Watching thousands of tiny toads crawl across a landscape can be a moving experience. It was for Ruth Milner when she started her career 30 years ago as a biologist for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.


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