HabitChat

Nature Watch: Going Undercover

In his latest blog installment of “Nature Watch,” Land Trust member Steve Ellis explains how some small mammals and amphibians, and bird species like Pacific Wrens find shelter in ground cover during the winter season. Read more about how life in a forest survives the stormy season and learn about other species you might find on your December adventures.


Nature Watch: The Wet Kingdom

In his latest blog installment of “Nature Watch,” Land Trust member Steve Ellis explains that cool, wet weather promotes a plethora of mushrooms that come in all different shapes, sizes and colors. Not only is it fun to discover the many types of fungi on your walk through the forest, they also offer significant benefits to terrestrial ecosystems. Read more to learn about Banana slugs and other species you might see in November.


Nature Watch: The Ups and Downs of Migration

In his latest blog installment of “Nature Watch,” Land Trust member Steve Ellis explains how in addition to the well-known north/south migration route that brings birds to the Islands from Alaska and Canada each October, there is also a lesser-known vertical migration. One that brings montane bird species down to our Puget Sound backyards in search of milder weather and plentiful food. Read more to learn about other species you might see in October.


Nature Watch: Days of Quiet Desperation

A hush descends upon local forests in late summer writes Land Trust member Steve Ellis in his latest blog installment of “Nature Watch.” Looking ahead to September, we can still look forward to seeing some wildflowers such as the eye-catching Canada Goldenrod. The beauty of the flowers might help offset the muting of birdsongs. Bird species that are getting ready to migrate enter a time of desperate overeating in anticipation for a long journey. Read more to learn about other species you might see in September.


Nature Watch: Bat Weather

Hot summer days followed by warm evenings produce abundant insects writes Land Trust member Steve Ellis in his latest blog installment of “Nature Watch.” Looking ahead to August, with the abundance of insects come bats. Keep your eyes peeled as the bat numbers peak by the first of August. Read more to learn about other species you might see in August.


Experience of a Lifetime

The Land Trust’s summer internship program provides opportunities for students and recent graduates to experience stewarding the bountiful nature of Whidbey Island.


Nature Watch: Made in the Shade

Warmer weather presents both opportunities and challenges to local bird life writes Land Trust member Steve Ellis in his latest blog installment of “Nature Watch.” Looking ahead to July, abundant sunshine and less precipitation dries out unshaded areas making it more difficult for birds looking for a quick meal. How to birds face this challenge? Read more to learn about the solutions and other species you might see in July.


Nature Watch: The Large and the Small

Growth spurred by lengthening daylight and warmer temperatures goes beyond the land to the Salish Sea writes Land Trust member Steve Ellis in his latest blog installment of “Nature Watch.” Looking ahead to June, the underwater kelp forests will explode with growth and harbor an amazing assortment of invertebrates that graze on the kelp. While young rockfish, gunnels and juvenile salmon are just a few fish species who may also be seen amongst the kelp in search for shelter and food. Read more to learn about the species you might see in June.


Nature Watch: Dawn Chorus

Up to 20 species can be heard vocalizing in our local forests writes Land Trust member Steve Ellis in his latest blog installment of “Nature Watch.” Looking ahead to May, we can expect a chorus in full voice. Male songbirds proclaiming a breeding territory while plants burst with a palette of colors to attract the attention of pollinators. Read more to learn about the species you might see in May.


Nature Watch: Nature in a Hurry

Only mammals seem unrushed writes Land Trust member Steve Ellis in his latest blog installment of “Nature Watch.” Looking ahead to April, we can expect to see migrating birds in a hurry to get to northern breeding grounds. Salmon making their way to Skagit and Dugualla bays. Plants leafing out and blooming. Some raccoon cubs and coyote pups could be welcomed to the world as well. Read more to learn about the species you might see in April.


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